For Parents and Families

Families are children's first and most important teachers. Families' involvement in children's learning at home as well as in child care and early learning programs can impact lifelong health and child development.

Child care and early learning providers and teachers play a central role in partnering with families on their children's learning and development. Therefore, it is important that families have access to information to help them make the right choices when selecting child care programs.

This website will help families learn more about:

  • Help paying for child care
  • How the child care subsidy program works
  • Types of child care
  • Finding quality child care
  • What to look for when choosing child care

Child Care Subsidy Eligibility Requirement

The New Jersey Child Care Subsidy Program helps income-eligible parents who are in school or working to pay for child care. You can use your subsidy at any licensed, regulated, registered or approved child care or early learning program that accepts subsidy payments.

Eligible Families:
  • Must meet income requirements and not have assets that exceed $1 million
  • Must be working full time (30 hours or more), attending school full time (12 credits or more), or in job training (at least 20 hours a week)
  • Must contribute to cost of care (Co-Pay)
Eligible Child:
  • Up to the age of 13 or less than 19 if under the Division of Protection and Permanency Child Protective supervision or mentally or physically incapable of self-care.
  • U.S. citizens or qualified legal aliens

Federal law changes require ALL child care providers to meet new health and safety standards.

 

The federal Child Care Development Block Grant Reauthorization Act of 2014 had two overall goals: giving working parents access to affordable, accessible child care, and encouraging the development of quality child care and early learning programs that ultimately will help children to grow up to be emotionally and socially healthy and meet with success at school.

 

These changes, which apply to all child care/early learning programs that accept child care subsidies, also more clearly define health and safety requirements. For example, the law expands who must be fingerprinted, what kinds of child care programs must be inspected, and monitored and requires that all child care programs must participate in health and safety training. The law also says that child care policy and information about child care choices must be available to families in language that is easy to understand and access. In addition to other general information about child care, that means you can find out about a child care program's license and whether any complaints have been filed.

 

If you would like more information about these federal changes, click here.